Tag Archives: English.

The Dilemma

  

Tired with the old prompt I am writing my own story.

My home country is an amalgam of languages. There are four provinces, and each has its own dialect—- Sindhi, Balochi, Punjabi, and Pushto. Then there are  more languages — Saraiki, Hindko, Gujrati, Hydrabadi, Kohistani, and three versions of Pushto. The unifying language in the country is the national language Urdu. Then there is English which is a kind of world language, is also spoken; not on street level, but in schools, and colleges which are English medium.

At home my (late) husband R, and I used to speak Pushto. Both of us were Pathans from the North Western Region. Our first born, our son was used to Pushto.

A problem occurred when he started playing outside with the other children. He couldn’t talk in Urdu. The children shunned him. The first time he came inside in tears, “nobody wants to play with me”.

To remedy the situation I started with Urdu. Children are quick, and in no time he picked up easily. He adjusted with the other children happily.

We never thought two languages at home would create a problem, and that’s what happened. Our daughter who is two years younger than her brother wasn’t saying a word even. She was two, and half years by then, and wouldn’t speak. We were scared that she might be mute.

We never realized that she was having difficulty in speaking because of us. Our little daughter was confused. R and I talked in Pushto. With our son we spoke Urdu, and with her we continued in Pushto. After getting over my initial worrying I started speaking Urdu with her.

Within a week, or two she was speaking words, then sentences —a chatterbox was born. She speaks very fast — the words tumble down in a hurry to be let out. My husband was forever telling her to slow down.

The children grew up, and a new problem surfaced. Their grandma (father’s mother, mine wasn’t alive) was annoyed as to why the children couldn’t speak Pushto. That was the only language she understood.

We tried to bribe the children with money to learn to speak their mother tongue, but they wouldn’t.

Actually they tried at first, but R would mimic their mistakes, and make fun of their attempts. This put them off, and they refused altogether. No amount of cajoling by me soothed their ruffled feathers.

They know Pushto now, and make good use of it in places where they want to communicate privately.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/daily-post-take-that-rosetta/

Take That, Rosetta!

If you could wake up tomorrow and be fluent in any language you don’t currently speak, which would it be? Why? What’s the first thing you do with your new linguistic skills?


Got a Zero

Dictionary, Shmictionary
by Ben Huberman
Time to confess: tell us about a time when you used a word whose meaning you didn’t actually know (or were very wrong about, in retrospect).

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Photo credit: Google

English is not my first language. Except for school, and college I wasn’t using it till last year Feb 2013 when I started my blog. I commit blunders, and I feel so bad when I discover them.

Back in school days, one word which got me a zero in English (that’s why it remains embedded in my memory), was the word did. While using it, I would add a past tense to it.

Mrs. G announced the English test results. I got the highest marks. She showed it to the class, and then called me to her desk. First she showed me the marks, then she circled the one mistake I had done, and then wrote,
“For this I am giving you a zero.”

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/dictionary-shmictionary/
http://wp.me/p23sd-nGo

A Hand-Me-Down

Daily Prompt: Hand-Me-Downs
Clothes and toys, recipes and jokes, advice and prejudice: we all have to handle all sorts of hand-me-downs every day. Tell us about some of the meaningful hand-me-downs in your life.

For a hand-me-down my father gave me (I was in 7th Grade) his book. This book is very dear to my heart.

Father had helped his friend when he badly needed a large sum of money. He asked father for help, as he couldn’t get a loan from else where.

Father forgot, but years later his friend sent a cheque, and as a thank you gave him the greatest gift of all times. Father never cashed that cheque. It still lies in the book.

This is a hard cover, (first published in 1939, and translated into English) a copy of the Quran by Abdullah Yusuf Ali.

I have it with me back home, and I will treasure it for always.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/hand-me-downs/
http://wp.me/p23sd-nIj

What to Say?

Daily Prompt: Head Turners
We often hear strange snippets of conversation as we walk through public spaces. When was the last time you overheard something so interesting, ridiculous, or disturbing you really wanted to know what it was all about?

As a teenager though I understood my mother tongue Pushto, I couldn’t speak it fluently. The reason was — at home our servants talked to us in Urdu or Punjabi, and at school English was mandatory. I grew up with basic rudimentary words of Pushto.

My Pushto improved with my marriage to my husband. Although I can’t write in it, but I can speak it fluently, and can read it too. In the beginning people around me would laugh at the words I spoke. At home R would hold his stomach, and laugh at my feeble attempts (at Pushto speaking).

A few years back at a village wedding, some village women were discussing me right in front of myself. Thank God for mercies, it was all complimentary. Nothing derogatory was said. They thought that I wouldn’t know what they were talking about. I moved away from them.

On one occasion my cousin’s wife went to visit her young widowed relation to offer condolences.

She laughingly asked me, “Do you know what you’re called behind your back?”

I braced myself for embarrassment. She kept on laughing making me assume God knows all sorts of things.

“The villagers call you an Angrez (a foreigner).”

Ooh! I breathed a sigh of relief. I was mentally prepared for something worse.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/head-turners/
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No Change In 2100

Daily Prompt: 2100
The language of the future: what will it be like? Show Future

Today our internet stopped working. I am writing quite late as it is.

Growing up spoke three languages
Pushto, Urdu and English
Got the three jumbled up
Would forget to my anguish

People I’ve known don’t use slang
So don’t know what to say
I don’t think English will change
It will go on the same way

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Images Credit: Google
http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/09/26/daily-prompt-future-2/
No Change In 2100